Wednesday, February 14, 2018

A Spiritual Canticle by St. John of the Cross: A Reading Journal

I have been meaning to read this book for some times, but I have always dreaded I won’t have enough time to plough the depth of the canticle. So, I decided to read the forty stanzas in forty weeks—one stanza a week. I am reading the Indonesian translation (titled: Madah Rohani), along with comments from a Carmelite priest, which I found very helpful to understand the canticle. This post would be my reading journal for the next forty weeks—I will jot down my thoughts of each stanza every week.

Stanza #1
Where have You hidden Yourself,
And abandoned me in my groaning, O my Beloved?
You have fled like the hart,
Having wounded me.
I ran after You, crying; but You were gone.

My thoughts:
It’s about a soul’s search for unity with God—pictured as a bride who is seeking her bridegroom. It loves God so much that it hurts—longing for the perfect happiness, which is unity with God in Heaven. But when it is still on earth, it must be satisfied by just getting a glimpse of Him. However, right when it feels Him, He would flash out of its reach; and this bleeds the soul so much more. It seems that God deliberately do this to strengthen the soul; to always wait in hope for the eternal "marriage". Apparently the nearer a soul to perfection, the greater it is tortured by love. 



Stanza #2
O shepherds, you who go
Through the sheepcots up the hill,
If you shall see Him
Whom I love the most,
Tell Him I languish, suffer, and die.

My thoughts:
The soul needs an intermediary (pictured as shepherds) to express its love lamentation to God (pictured as hill—or the highest peak). Here the commentator suggests that the intermediary could be its own longing and affection; or it could also means the angels—I am more inclined to the latter. So the soul begs the angels to speak about its sorrowful love to Him (whom the angels could reach easier than the soul) when the time is right for Him (or if God is willing) to listen to it (“if you shall see Him”). Here the soul does not demand anything; it just gives hints about its anguish and let the Lover do what He desires. By humbling itself, perhaps God would take more pity to the soul.



Stanza #3


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