Thursday, November 1, 2012

Let’s Read Plays MASTER POST



I’m very pleased to finally kick off our Let’s Read Plays, a yearlong event to read classics plays from varied authors (see the sign up post for more detailed info). This is the master post where you can link up all your reviews and other posts during the event, which ends on 31 October 2013. Once in a while I will organize all the posts based on category, to make it easier to navigate.

You are welcomed to sign up here; the signing up will be closed on 15 November 2012.

Must I sign up formally? Can’t I just participate and post reviews in my blog?
Yes, you can. But signing up help us to get to know all the participants, how many we are here, and once in a while we might want to have a visit to your blogs :). Plus…by signing up by 15 November 2012 you will be eligible for some giveaways throughout Let’s Read Plays event, yayyy! :)

I just found out this event after 15 November 2012. Can I still participate?
Yes, you can. You can participate on all activities during the year, but unfortunately you won’t be included in the giveaways.

During the event we would have a lot of fun, besides reading and reviewing plays. There would be memes, game and giveaways; here in this blog as well as in Dessy’s blog (my co-host) and in other participants’ who have confirmed to host theirs as well. If you would like to host anything, you are always welcomed (except for meme, as we already have two); just fill in this form and let me know when you have done it (because I do not check everyday).

To put your link in the linky, please use this format:

Post title (blog name)
For example: Master Post (Fanda Classiclit)

For posts in Bahasa Indonesia only, please add [IND] behind your name
For example: Master Post (Fanda Classiclit) - [IND]

And last but not least, check in every once and a while, because from time to time I might post some updates, giveaways or other activities during the event. The updates would be placed on the top sidebar, under the Let’s Read Plays banner. If you have twitter, you can follow @Fanda_A for updates, or just check in #LRP which would be our official hashtag during the event.

To remind you, here's our reading theme schedule:

Nov '12 Shakespeare's Tragedy
Dec '12  Shakespeare's Comedy
Jan '13   freebie
Feb '13  Shakespeare's History
Mar '13 Greek
Apr '13  Shakespeare's Comedy
May '13  Shakespeare's Tragedy
Jun '13  Oscar Wilde
Jul '13    Other author
Aug '13 Shakespeare's Comedy
Sep '13  freebie
Oct '13  Shakespeare's Tragedy



26 comments:

  1. I'm really looking fwd to this!

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    1. Yes, me too! *directly grab my ebook for my first play for this event* :)

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    1. Yep, already noted! Let's Read Plays!
      What are you going to start with? I'm having a date with Julius You-Know-Who ;)

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  3. And just for stupid beginners: you said we should write "Post title (blog name)" - that should be written in the "name" field of Mr.Linky? And the URL for the post in the "URL" field?

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    1. OK, I did as I understand it and I've linked my post on Macbeth. I have just started, so there are only some plans and materials. I will update this post as I read not to spam you with links. And if anybody is also reading Macbeth this month - let's do it together!

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    2. You have done it OK, Arenel! Sorry to not response earlier, because I don't blog after office hours.. :)

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    3. I'm sorry, I'm new to linky, but somehow there are two of my links there now. I'm pretty sure I went there and clicked delete the link, and then added a new link to the URL of the label, as you've suggested. But it seems something went wrong. Could you please just delete the first of my links (number 2)?

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    4. Arenel, I have deleted your #2 link. I thought at first that you intended to put both links :) The links can only be updated/deleted from the owner's dashboard, so just let me know if you have mistakenly added it, I will edit it for you.

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    5. OK, thanks! No, I've intention to spam :) I just looked at how much I write for each act and decided to take your advise about the label =)

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    6. Oh, great! I think I will use it for my posts too.. ;)

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  4. I just posted on my first play, the tragedy, today!

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    1. Yayyy! Thanks for your enthusiasm, Melissa. I'm just beginning Julius Caesar today :)

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    2. Thanks for updating my link! Enjoy Julius Caesar, it's an intense political piece!

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    3. You're welcome. I'm enjoying Julius Caesar, although sadly, I'm rather busy these days that I could only read it partially at a time. It's a shame, because I think plays are best reading in a whole, at least a whole Act at a time. :(

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    1. Have fun with Romeo and Juliet, then... ;)

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  6. I finally finish my first play!

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    1. Congrats Joon Ann! I'm in the middle of my 2nd play now...

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  7. Fanda I put the link for the January giveway in Mister Linky. Thank you.

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  8. Fanda, I would like to thank you for recommending Julius Caesar, which I have never thought I would read or enjoy. I really loved it, and I trust your taste 

    The play is an art product that consists of historical, artistic, language and rhetoric, psychological, and supernatural (Gothic) elements and dimensions.

    Shakespeare was a genius, who had the power to turn the play from a specific historical play into a work with universal themes and concepts. In another way of speaking, although it is about a specific historical event in the Roman era, namely, the assassination of Julius Caesar, but it is also about the human nature and human condition. It is about the human aspiration throughout history to achieve a utopian world, where liberty, freedom, and peace prevail.

    What I particularly like is the way Shakespeare reveal the powerful and critical role of rhetoric in changing people’s (mob) attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors and actions, which, of course, takes place during a critical time (after the shock of a traumatic event; the assassination of Julius Caesar). In such a moment, people are a bit confused, numbed, and are unable to get the clear idea or the meaning of the situation, which make them particularly vulnerable. I also like how Shakespeare presents his characters in a way that shows both the good and evil in them, emphasizing the notion that no person is 100% evil.

    The character I liked the most was Brutus, who was a noble person standing on firm ground, but I person I liked the less was Marcus Antonius because, to some extent he was a climber and an opportunist.

    Finally, I find some elements, such as the soothsayer, omens, and ghost, from another plays like Hamlet and Macbeth, and might help build familiarity.

    Maan K (https://twitter.com/MaanK2)

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    1. I'm glad you liked JC too, one of my favorite passage was Antony's speech: "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears..." From all Shakespeares I've read so far, this one remains my most favorite.

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  9. Thanks to you, Fanda! You made me read it, and You have a great taste :-)

    I agree Antony's speech is one of the greatest passages in the play, as it shows the power of words in shaping people's attitudes and beliefs.. A fearful speech, actually.

    You may be surprised, but the sentence I particulary liked in the play is when Brutus said to the gods: "O ye gods,
    Render me worthy of this noble wife!". I liked it because, as you can see in the play, there is a kind of gender bias, where women were somehow described as inferior to men; but in this sentence, Brutus gave a superior place to his wife.. LOL.. Although I am a man, but I don't like gender discrimination.. LOL.

    My favorite plays are Othello (I love Verdi's Opera too), Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, The Tempest, and MidSummer Night's Dream.

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    1. Agree! Brutus isn't like any other male characters in Shakespeare; he has respect to his wife.

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What do you think?